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The Americas & Caribbean

About Quebec City

Compact and picturesque, Quebec City is by many accounts the most French city in New France. The Old Town’s centerpiece, the magnificent Château Frontenac, seems transported from the palatial landscapes of the Loire Valley; and its French-accented streets, such as the winding Rue Sous-le-Cap and the Avenue Sainte-Geneviève, lead past white-stone buildings that evoke old-world medieval villages. The only remaining walled city in North America outside of Mexico, Quebec City was fortified in the 17th century soon after its founding in 1608 by explorer Samuel de Champlain. Its strategic setting on the rocky promontory of Cape Diamond gave troops a close view of the St. Lawrence River. You can still enjoy the vista today, particularly from Dufferin Terrace, the boardwalk that doubles as a fairground of street performers in the summer. Quebec City is more than a gathering place for the Quebecois people; it is also where the products of Quebec province’s countryside converge in markets and restaurants. The Île d’Orléans’s Paillasson cheese, the Eastern Townships’ ice cider and more all find their place at the table in this romantic and atmospheric city.